Arts and Entertainment Archives - Page 10 of 14 - Newport Dispatch
Category archive

Arts and Entertainment - page 10

Northsong Winter Concert Series Starts December 5

in Arts and Entertainment/Barton/Newport

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

NEWPORT — Northsong, the Newport-based chamber choir, is proud to announce their upcoming Winter Concert series, which will see the group perform in Barton and Newport.

Under the direction of Anne K. Hamilton with Vivian Spates, accompanist, Northsong will perform their annual Winter Concert on December 5 and December 7, 2014.

On the program are Laud to the Nativity by Respighi, choruses from Bach’s Mass in B Minor, Faure’s Cantique de Jean Racine, plus a selection of other seasonal songs.

The first concert will be given on Friday, December 5, at 7:30 p.m. at the Barton United Church, in Barton.

The second show will be held on Sunday, December 7, at 4:00 p.m. at the Newport United Church, in Newport.

The suggested donation is $5.00. Both concert locations are accessible.

For further information see www.northsong.org or call (802) 895-4942.

Sterling College faculty member Pavel Cenkl is planning a 275 km, 3-day solo run across Iceland, from the Atlantic to the Arctic

Sterling College faculty member to run 275K for climate resilience

in Arts and Entertainment/Craftsbury

Sterling College faculty member Pavel Cenkl is planning a 275 km, 3-day solo run across Iceland, from the Atlantic to the Arctic
Sterling College faculty member Pavel Cenkl is planning a 275 km, 3-day solo run across Iceland, from the Atlantic to the Arctic

CRAFTSBURY — Pavel Cenkl, faculty in Environmental Humanities at Sterling College, is going the extra mile for climate resilience—171 extra miles.

Cenkl is planning on completing a 275 km (170.8 mile), 3-day solo run across Iceland, from the Atlantic to the Arctic, in June 2015 to highlight the role that athletes and adventurers play in building climate resistance.

“Climate change impacts all of us, but athletes have a unique relationship to the outdoors.” Cenkl says. “And we have a connection to our changing climate through the daily choices we make about how and where to travel, what equipment to use, and how we choose to support climate resilience initiative. It is in the best interest of the planet and of our own goals as an outdoor community to invest in building climate resilience.”

IMG_1854The run will be taking place in June of 2015. The run follows an ancient Viking path along both trails and roads among rivers, waterfalls, glaciers, thermal springs, and through a high desert. Cenkl chose Iceland for this project because the Arctic is among the places on earth where climate change is most apparent and most pronounced.

“Recent years have seen open water at the North Pole and melting permafrost in Siberia and Alaska,” Cenkl said. “Iceland has seen some glaciers retreat nearly 1000 meters over the past twenty years.”

Cenkl has been training for his run as both a solo runner and as the coach of the U.S.’s only collegiate Ultra Trail Running Team, Sterling College’s Skyrunners.

“My hope is to inspire other athletes, adventurers, and outdoor enthusiasts of all kinds to take the initiative to preserve the lands that we love to explore and to find solutions to the challenges of climate change.”

Sponsors for the run include Sterling College, University Center of the Westfjords, Level Renner, Atayne, PocketFuel, Petzl, the Catamount Trail Association, Newton Running, Yonder, Skida, Squirrel Stash Nuts, and the Craftsbury General Store.

Cenkl currently has a crowdsourced funding campaign to support both his run and to fund scholarships for students at both Sterling College and the University Center of the Westfjords in Iceland to study climate resilience. You can find Cenkl’s Indiegogo campaign at:

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/kjolur-run-athletes-for-climate-resilience.

Christmas Arts and Crafts Fair in Derby draws a crowd

in Arts and Entertainment/Derby

Derby Vermont Craft FairDERBY — On Saturday, the Dailey Memorial Library hosted their 23rd Annual Christmas Arts and Crafts Fair inside the gymnasium of North Country Junior High.

The event not only helps raise money for the library, it allows visitors the chance to get an early start on their Christmas shopping. Those who attended were treated to an eclectic mix of products showcasing the rich tradition of arts and crafts throughout the region.

Richard and Vera Long, of Long Branch Wooden Bowls, brought out a large inventory of wood turned bowls.

To make the bowls, the couple harvests the logs from their property in Holland. Mr. Long starts with a rough cut, then shelves and dates each piece. Once dry, they are put back on the lathe for final shaping. They are finished in walnut oil and beeswax. It takes about ten to twelve months for each piece to be finished.

Derby Vermont news Richard Wambach, from Nic & Wambach Creative Arts, had a collection of drawings set up that captured picturesque scenes from across the state. Wambach, based out of Red Hook, New York, says he visits Vermont once a month, and is inspired by its beauty.

Another tradition, and a popular attraction at the Christmas Arts and Crafts Fair, is the Christmas Café. Visitors were served homemade soups and finger roll sandwiches.

Saturday’s craft fair lasted until 3 p.m., and saw a steady flow of visitors throughout the day.

Photo by Tanya Mueller on the Derby Bike Path.

Scenes from Orleans County Fall Foliage 2014

in Arts and Entertainment/Vermont

orleans county vermont fall foliageAs we brace ourselves for another winter, we take time to look back on the brilliant show of color nature presented us this fall foliage season in Orleans County. From bright yellows to vibrant reds, the leaves transformed, showing their rich and vibrant hues.

At the beginning of the season, Newport Dispatch News asked our readers to send us their best foliage pictures. The collection of photos we received captured the area in all its fall glory.

As Orleans County turns white over the next months, we are reminded that no matter what the color of the landscape, we live in a beautiful world.

We would like to thank all our readers who sent in these photos, helping us to document a beautiful fall 2014 in Orleans County.

Photo by Tanya Mueller in Derby.
Photo by Tanya Mueller in Derby.
Photo by Tanya Mueller.
Photo by Tanya Mueller.
Photo by Bob Minnie in Newport.
Photo by Bob Minnie in Newport.
Photo by Tanya Mueller  in Derby Line.
Photo by Tanya Mueller in Derby Line.
Photo by Laura Comtois Lawson in Derby.
Photo by Laura Comtois Lawson in Derby.
Photo by Tanya Mueller at Lake Willoughby.
Photo by Tanya Mueller at Lake Willoughby.
Alison Jeanpierre.
Photo by Alison Jeanpierre.
Photo by Dawn Greenwood.
Photo by Dawn Greenwood.
Photo by Coleen Cole in Newport.
Photo by Coleen Cole in Newport.
Photo by Coleen Cole in Irasburg.
Photo by Coleen Cole in Irasburg.
Photo by Tanya Mueller in Holland.
Photo by Tanya Mueller in Holland.
Stacie Lynn Greenwood in Derby.
Stacie Lynn Greenwood in Derby.
Photo by Kaitlyn Young.
Photo by Kaitlyn Young.
Photo by Bryan Marovich in Westmore.
Photo by Bryan Marovich in Westmore.
Photo by Alain De La Bruere in Greensboro.
Photo by Alain De La Bruere in Greensboro.
Photo by Becky Deyo on Rt. 100.
Photo by Becky Deyo on Rt. 100.
Photo by Tanya Mueller  in Westmore.
Photo by Tanya Mueller in Westmore.
Photo by Maureen Gentile Profera.
Photo by Maureen Gentile Profera.
Photo by Michelle Letourneau on the Bike Path in Derby.
Photo by Michelle Letourneau on the Bike Path in Derby.
Photo by Tanya Mueller in Holland.
Photo by Tanya Mueller in Holland.
Photo by Shirley Davis in Derby.
Photo by Shirley Davis in Derby.
Photo by Kaitlyn Young.
Photo by Kaitlyn Young.
Photo by Shirley Davis in West Charleston.
Photo by Shirley Davis in West Charleston.
Photo by Tanya Mueller at Lake Willoughby.
Photo by Tanya Mueller at Lake Willoughby.
Photo by Patricia Przybylinski in West Charleston.
Photo by Patricia Przybylinski in West Charleston.
Photo by Dawn Greenwood in Troy.
Photo by Dawn Greenwood in Troy.
Photo by Kaitlyn Young.
Photo by Kaitlyn Young.
Photo by Alain De La Bruere in Newport.
Photo by Alain De La Bruere in Newport.
Photo by Shirley Davis  in Derby.
Photo by Shirley Davis in Derby.
Photo by Dawn Greenwood in Troy.
Photo by Dawn Greenwood in Troy.
Photo by Amanda Burdick in Jay Peak.
Photo by Amanda Burdick in Jay Peak.
Photo by Alain De La Bruere in Newport.
Photo by Alain De La Bruere in Newport.
Photo by Coleen Cole in Derby/Newport.
Photo by Coleen Cole in Derby/Newport.
Photo by Tanya Mueller in Holland.
Photo by Tanya Mueller in Holland.
Photo by Tanya Mueller on the Derby Bike Path.
Photo by Tanya Mueller on the Derby Bike Path.

International Games Day at the Goodrich Library

in Arts and Entertainment/Newport

IGD12-full-logo

NEWPORT — On November 15, from 11:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., the Goodrich Memorial Library in Newport is teaming up with Border Board Games to host International Games Day at your library.

Stop by to play a variety of games for all ages. There will be five laptops available for Minecraft, board games for all ages, Star Wars X-Wings miniatures, a roleplaying gaming table, and a box of Legos to build your own ideas.

Everyone is welcome to attend and there will be games suitable for kids, teens and adults.

Stop by and try something new like Ticket to Ride or Caracassonne, or play an old favorite like Clue or Candyland. Border Board Games will be there to teach any of the tabletop games.

International Games Day at your library is an initiative run by volunteers from around the world and by the American Library Association, in partnership with Nordic Game Day and the Australian Library and Information Association, to reconnect communities through their libraries around the educational, recreational, and social value of all types of games.

For more information, please contact the Goodrich library at 802-334-7902. or visit http://goodrichlibrary.org/wordpress/.

Hungerfest 2014 just around the corner

in Arts and Entertainment/Newport

hungerfest2014 Final

NEWPORT — There’s nothing fun about not having enough food in your refrigerator or cupboard, but the organizers of Hungerfest know there’s no reason not to have a little fun while helping people get the food they need.

Hungerfest 2014 takes place this year at the East Side Restaurant in Newport on November 7, from 7:00 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

Located on the beautiful waterfront of Lake Memphremagog, Hungerfest at the East Side invites people to come and listen first to the talented acoustic performances of Wayne Warner, Joe Patrissi and Tod Pronto, take part in a 50-50 raffle and refreshments at the break, and then dance the night away to the 60’s classic rock of the 66 City Band.

There will be other prizes and perhaps a few surprises too.

All funds raised from ticket sales and the raffle will go directly to the Northeast Kingdom Community Action (NEKCA) Food Shelf.

The Orleans County Food Shelf feeds an average of 1266 people, both adults and children, every month. The Caledonia County Food Shelf feeds an average of 1246 children and adults every month. In addition to any cash raised, there will be a place for people to donate non-perishable food items as well at the event.

Dance and do good at the same time. Shimmy and share. Tickets are available at NEKCA, Right Wheels, Northpoint, East Side Restaurant Gift Shop, and NEKTV.

You may also call NEKCA at 334-7316 to have tickets held for you at the door.

Winners of the 2nd annual Hunger Bowl, "Boys and Girls Club of the Northeast Kingdom.

Everyone wins in 2nd annual Hunger Bowl

in Arts and Entertainment/Newport
Winners of the 2nd annual Hunger Bowl, "Boys and Girls Club of the Northeast Kingdom.
Winners of the 2nd annual Hunger Bowl, “Boys and Girls Club of the Northeast Kingdom.

NEWPORT — About three hundred people attended the second annual Hunger Bowl flag football tournament at the Lyndon Town School’s soccer fields on Sunday.

According to Hunger Bowl organizers Vaughn Cloney of Newport and Jason Royer of Lyndonville, the event raised about $1000 more than last year’s maiden games, bringing in $3128 in cash and 550 pounds of donated food.

“We can’t thank the businesses who donated, the volunteers, the teams, the fans, enough,” Royer said.

There were literal “winners” in the games, however, it was more about supporting a good cause, and raising money and awareness for the NEKCA Food Shelves in both Orleans and Caledonia counties. Each participant brought in 2 cans of donated food, and paid $100 each to play.

First Place – “The Boys and Girls Club of the NEK”
Second Place – “We Thought This was Basketball”
Third Place – “The Dirty Turtles”

Second Place team, "We Thought This Was Basketball."
Second Place team, “We Thought This Was Basketball.”

“When I was young and my parents divorced, we had to use the food shelves for awhile,” Vaughn Cloney remembers.

Royer shared a similar experience.

“As a child, I remember we could have used a food-bank like this. It feels good to give back to the community I live in. It may feel like a stress and a lot of work involved to make it happen, but in the end it’s actually a stress reliever,” he said, explaining why the organizers are winners too.

According to NEKCA, one in four children live in households that suffer from “food insecurity”. The food shelf in Orleans County benefits an average of 1266 individuals every month, and the Caledonia County food shelf benefits an average of 1246 people each month.

This year’s Hunger Bowl is the proverbial kick-off for a pair of fundraising events to benefit the food shelves. Hunger Bowl will be closely followed by “Hunger Fest” on November 7, from 7 – 11:30 p.m. at the East Side Restaurant in Newport on the waterfront. There will be food, music, dancing and more chances to donate food or cash for NEKCA food shelves.

Third Place team, "Dirty Turtles."
Third Place team, “Dirty Turtles.”

Joe Patrissi, Executive Director of NEKCA, pointed out, “Why should people have to choose between heating their house and feeding their family?” He also noted being “food insecure” can hit anyone at any time because of job loss, medical events and many other unforeseen events. It’s a community issue.

Vaughn Cloney and Jason Royer have watched their brainchild grow and take important steps in year two, aided by other community committee members including NEKCA staff, Tod Pronto of NEKTV, and others who helped in a variety of ways.

This year more teams played, more people attended, and more money was raised.

Local musician Tod Pronto is seeking the help of his fans and the community to allow his new album, "It Can't All Be Wrong," to be completed.

Tod Pronto reaches out to fans and community to help produce new album

in Arts and Entertainment/Newport

Local musician Tod Pronto is seeking the help of his fans and the community to allow his new album, "It Can't All Be Wrong," to be completed.
Local musician Tod Pronto is seeking the help of his fans and the community to allow his new album, “It Can’t All Be Wrong,” to be completed.
NEWPORT — Local singer-songwriter Tod Pronto is going the crowd-funding route in his quest to bring his latest album It Can’t All Be Wrong, a project he’s been working on since 2010, to his fans.

Born and raised in Newport, Pronto first found his musical voice as the front man in the rock band Foozle, which legend has it was banned from a bar in Waitsfield for playing “Free Bird” for 90 minutes straight.

Still keeping it real, and having come a long way in his career since then, Pronto continues to work with local musicians he has collaborated with over the years. His new album is being recorded locally, and many of the songs were written here in the Northeast Kingdom over the last four years.

The new album is also a very personal one for Pronto, because although it is a project he has been working on since 2010, some of the songs on it go back to 2003, to a point in his career where he was recording in Nashville. Back then the focus was often on writing hits, sometimes for other artists, and not always strictly for himself.

He says that although some of the songs on It Can’t All Be Wrong were written years ago in Nashville, this 10-song album was penned mostly for himself, exploring themes we all go through in our lives.

“The excitement of new love, the despair of ending relationships, self esteem building, soul searching and self worth, flash backs to younger days, the realization that no matter what, my guitar is always there, and of course a 1974 Dodge Dart,” he said, listing a few of the subjects we can expect to hear him explore in his music.

Pronto tends to write music in his living room, but it has happened before that a song will come to him out of nowhere, once forcing him to sing the lyrics into his voice memo phone app so he wouldn’t forget it while driving down the road.

“You have to capture the ideas when they come to you,” Pronto said. “It almost always starts with a melody in my head and I usually don’t know what the subject of the song will be until I have written the chord progression, and it comes to me as I hum the melody. Most of my songs only take me about 15 minutes to write the lyrics and then a few weeks to fine tune everything.”

It Can’t All Be Wrong will be mixed professionally in Los Angeles, so that it has that clear, crisp sound and punch you hear from songs on the radio. As he puts it, “still very real and not overly processed. You can feel the music.”

The album combines a wide variety of music from rock, alt-country, folk, power pop, and even a dance type song called, “The Devil Will Never Win.”

But before the album is able to be completed, Pronto is seeking the help of his fans, and members of the community, through a fundraising campaign he started on IndieGoGo.

He has this to say for anyone who may be interested in helping him bring this long-awaited album to fruition:

I guess the biggest thing I want to convey is that I am really proud of this album and that the reason it has taken so long to finish is that it was all done very carefully and proper. It is easy to just record on a laptop these days on Audacity or some program you download but to give the songs the proper punch so it sounds like all the big time people on the radio it is best to leave the mix up to a professional. And, it is not cheap…but boy can you hear the difference and it is totally worth it in the long run.

So I have dropped $3K of my own money on this in the last 3 years and with the help I receive from this campaign the album will be out by spring the latest. Without it, it may not happen…or it may not happen for another year. So I am grateful to anyone that can help me no matter how small and to anyone that helps share the IndieGoGo link. It is so much fun to involve people in this process and it is something I am glad I tried.

If you would like to learn more about this project, visit the IndieGoGo Page.

latestvideo_thumbnail

Photo by Tanya Mueller.

A successful first season for Now Playing Newport music series

in Arts and Entertainment/Newport/News
Photo by Tanya Mueller.
Photo by Tanya Mueller.

NEWPORT — The Now Playing Newport music series has successfully completed its first season. Over 100 artists provided a wide spectrum of music and over 650 people attended the 9 programs presented. All in all it was a great start to a great series. Now Playing Newport is the only regular year-round music series in Newport.

Artists for the second season are being contacted for 12 or more programs planned for 2015. Organizers say that requests from artists to perform the series has been overwhelming.

Series Director Jim McKimm released this statement:

We want to extend our gratitude to St Marks for sharing the vision of this project. Their largesse has provided Now Playing Newport with a venue and collaborative partnership during our premiere season. Our second season is expanding rapidly and anticipates providing additional performance sites to accommodate for larger ensembles and audiences.

Responses from performers has been not only positive, but encouraging to broaden the series and encompass the Greater Newport area. The series is also highlighted with local youth talent under the direction of Dr. Sara Doncaster. In addition, we are extremely fortunate to have a resident orchestra in Newport under the baton of Ken Michelli offering small ensemble groups to the series. These concerts will be returning next season.

All of this talent needs underwriting. It has been a myth that many of the artists provide their talents gratis. For many of our artists, this is their livelihood. Occasionally fees are reduced by the performers to help us make the series affordable to the public. We are grateful for that. It allows us to keep ticket prices as low as possible so that many can attend. We do apply for grants, but they are getting fewer and very competitive, with no guarantee of acceptance.

So why not Join the Chorus and Sing the praises of the unique music series, Now Playing Newport and become a Patron of the Arts? We do not ask for much; every little bit helps and no amount is too small. The added bonus….your contribution is tax deductible.

We ask you to visit our Partnership page at our website. Here you will find a special thank you for your Business or Individual partnership of $75 or more to complete our programming plans for 2015. Of course, your attendance at our programs also gives us your support.

Lynn Leimer, accompanied by Janice Luce, leads the crowd in a farewell sing along of Shine On, Harvest Moon. Photo Courtesy of Catherine Holm

A night of music and readings at the MAC raises money for scholarship fund

in Arts and Entertainment/Newport
The amazing Lynn Leimer, accompanied by Janice Luce, performing at the MAC Friday night. Photo courtesy of Catherine Holm
The amazing Lynn Leimer, accompanied by Janice Luce, at the MAC Friday night. Photo courtesy of Catherine Holm

NEWPORT — On Friday, the MAC Center for the Arts held the Muse-ical Harvest event.

More than 50 people attended and enjoyed diverse performances by several area performers and writers. The MAC Center, located in downtown Newport, was filled with instrumental music, vocal music, and readings throughout the night.

The event was a huge success, raising almost $200 toward the MAC’s scholarship fund, which goes to a young student in the community.

Janice Luce performs on piano.
Janice Luce performs on piano.

The MAC Center for the Arts is a spacious 2000 sq. ft., street-level gallery that showcases the work of member artists, photographers, handcrafters, writers and musicians. The art is changed quarterly to keep the gallery fresh, and they hold free receptions throughout the year that are open to the public, featuring live music and refreshments at each changeover.

In additional to the gallery, there is a classroom space located on the lower level. They frequently host visiting exhibits, original exhibits, special member exhibits, lectures, classes and workshops in this space.

An attentive crowd at Muse-ical Harvest, MAC Center for the Arts

Runners in this year's Halloween Hustle at the starting line. Photos courtesy of Phil White.

A ghoulish Halloween Hustle through Newport

in Arts and Entertainment/Derby/Newport/News
Runners in this year's Halloween Hustle at the starting line. Photos courtesy of Phil White.
Runners in this year’s Halloween Hustle at the starting line. Photos courtesy of Phil White.

NEWPORT — Runners showed up on Saturday in their finest Halloween costumes for the 10K, 5K, and 1 mile runs, in this year’s Halloween Hustle.

Participants came to Newport from all over Vermont and New York, as well as Quebec City, Sutton, Waterloo, and Bromont. There was even a strong contingent from Newport Elementary School.

An impromptu costume parade through downtown Newport, led to a quick start at Field Avenue.

11-year-old Matt Moore of Derby, claimed first place overall in the 5K Run with a time of 22:08. He fended off 31-year-old Irfan Sehic of Burlington, by over a minute.

“That kid is fast,” Irfan said as he turned to congratulate Matt at “The Fish,” which was the official finish of the race.

Kimberly Clark of Sutton, running as Frankenstein’s Bride, took home first in the women’s division, with a time of 26:41.

Ryan Moore, Matt’s father, won the 10K with a time of 47:42. Francine Amyot, of Quebec City, running in her Holstein Cow suit, finished first in the woman’s division, with a time of 1:03:25.

Almost half of the runners were age 18 and under, with numerous parent-child combos showing up and running together.

A spontaneous “after party” at Brown Dog Bistro was also a hit.
DSC_0294

A portion of the proceeds went to support Green Mountain United Way, which also held a 50-50 raffle, won by April Farnham of Plainfield. Twenty percent of the fees from Canadian registrants went to the Fondation Christian Vachon of Magog, QC.

Next year’s Halloween Hustle will be on October 31, 2015. Event organizers are already forming a decorating committee to help spook up the bike path a little to add to the fun.

Next up will be The Santa Run on December 6th, hosted in partnership with Newport Parks and Recreation Department and Newport Live. Kingdom Games is also teaming up with Northpoint Chrysler, Dodge Jeep and Ram, to raise money and gather toys for the local Toys for Kids program. Register on line at www.kingdomgames.co. Fees are $35 for adults, and $15 for kids.

Registration includes a Santa Costume and entry into a great fun run.
DSC_0225

Newport Area Community Orchestra getting ready for Fall concert

in Arts and Entertainment/Newport/News

NACO 1

NEWPORT — The Newport Area Community Orchestra is getting ready for its fourth annual fall concert at the Goodrich Memorial Library. The concert will take place on Saturday, November 1, 2014 at 1:00 p.m.

The orchestra is asking for a $5 per person tax-deductible donation for the concert. The program will include the following pieces:

Concerto for Harp by Handel (Abigail Stockman, Soloist)
Concertino for Horns and Orchestra by Witt (Marc and Ros Semprebon, Anna Shelow, Soloists)
The Watchers for Two Flutes, Oboe, Clarinet and Orchestra by Gibson (Paula Hansen-Graveline, Heather Webster, John Barr, Chris Maginniss, Soloists)
Nocturne for Cello and Orchestra by Tchaikovsky (Thurmond Knight, Soloist)
Symphony No. 100 (The Military) by Haydn

Since 2011, the orchestra has grown to over 40 members and is still growing. Besides performing at various local venues throughout the year, the Newport Area Community Orchestra presents three annual concerts.

They play once in the spring, and twice in the fall, with one fall concert done to raise money for the Haskell Opera House.

70’s cult classic musical coming to Derby Line Saturday

in Arts and Entertainment/Derby Line

Picture 47DERBY LINE — This Saturday, October 25, the 70’s cult musical classic, the science fiction, double feature where you can do the time warp again, will be playing at the Derby Line Village Hall.

Because of licensing restrictions, promoters cannot publicly advertise the name of the movie, but they can give hints. One hint is this cult classic encourages full audience participation, so bring your props–squirt guns, toast, rice, newspapers. Feel free to dress in costume.

Okay, still stumped? The title has four words.

First word: The name of a boxing series Sylvester Stallone made famous.
Second word: A genre Stephen King is famous for.
Third word: A photographer takes one.
Fourth word: A (insert word) of hands.

Doors open at 6:15 p.m. and the movie will begin at 7. Concessions will be available for sale. Sales of concessions go to benefit the Derby Line Events Committee.

The Derby Line Events Committee is expanding their free movie night with this event, which is in addition to the regular First Friday Free Family Movie.

This movie is rated R and is for mature audiences only. Ages 18 and older only. If you have any questions, send an email to myersbethany@hotmail.com.

(back row left to right) Marianna Barrett, Justin Bouchard, Cooper Brueck, Ian Applegate, Charlie Thompson, (front row) Frankie Thompson, Corbin Brueck, Arne Bannach, Noah Fortin.

Youth learning to connect with the Clyde River

in Arts and Entertainment/Derby/News/Outdoors
(back row left to right) Marianna Barrett, Justin Bouchard, Cooper Brueck, Ian Applegate, Charlie Thompson, (front row) Frankie Thompson, Corbin Brueck, Arne Bannach, Noah Fortin.
(back row left to right) Marianna Barrett, Justin Bouchard, Cooper Brueck, Ian Applegate, Charlie Thompson, (front row) Frankie Thompson, Corbin Brueck, Arne Bannach, Noah Fortin.

DERBY — The Clyde River has a long tradition of kids spending time outdoors along its reach. From paddling its swiftwater sections, fishing for brookies in deep pools, jigging for smelt on winter ice, hunting forest partridge along its wooded margins, or simply skipping rocks after swimming on a hot summer day.

Unfortunately, these days kids spend less time on rivers and more and more time indoors in front of screens. With a project goal both simple and lofty, Coutts-Moriarty Camp has aimed to help local youths to rekindle their connection with the Clyde River, and thus create the next generation of our community’s river stewards.

With the help of a “Small and Inspiring Grant” from The Vermont Community Foundation, the Coutts-Moriarty Camp has been able to start a project called Clyde River Connections, a place-based afterschool series that connects kids to their communities in the Clyde River watershed through interactive science, outdoor recreation, cultural activities, and service work.

A dozen local kids have been gathering for 2.5 hours one day a week throughout an 18 week extended after school series to swim, fish, paddle, hike, investigate, conduct historical research, meet locals with strong Clyde connections, monitor water quality, generate discussions of sustainability beside a local hydroelectric dam, and give back to this amazing ecological and economic resource that links our local communities.

A 2006 study conducted by the Eastern Brook Trout Joint Venture identified the upper Clyde River subwatershed as among only 14 percent of watersheds in Vermont with intact brook trout populations. Water quality surveys and stream geomorphic assessments completed over the past decade have also identified the Clyde as in the best condition of the four tributaries of Lake Memphremagog.

In all The Vermont Community Foundation awarded 35 Small and Inspiring grants totaling $69,379 to support projects in towns across the state this spring and summer. The Small and Inspiring program funds work that helps connect people to their neighbors, their land, and their history in ways that strengthen the fabric of the community.

Glover Historical Society was also recently awarded $1,000 to support It Takes A Village: Glover Pioneer Camp Community Outreach and Awareness Campaign, a series of social and informational activities at the Historic Parker Settlement and public events to increase awareness of the camp as a resource and build community engagement.

Four exciting “Winter Games” planned in Newport

in Arts and Entertainment/Newport/Outdoors

Winter Games Newport Vermont

NEWPORT — Winter Games, the colder counterpart of Kingdom Games, has several exciting events and initiatives planned for this winter. They include:

The North American Speedskating Marathon Championships on January 31 – February 1, 2015.

As part of this event, weather and ice conditions permitting, they will be clearing and maintaining a 700 meter speedskating oval adjacent to The EastSide Restaurant. Once the event has taken place, organizers will be attempting to keep the oval open through the middle of March for the public to use. 

The Great Skate Monday February 2nd, 2015. 

Last year they were able to plow the length of the lake between Newport and Magog. In total, 25 Nordic skaters registered for the event, 20 actually participated, and 10 made it the full distance. Part of this will be the clearing and construction of a Nordic skating trail that will go from Newport Bay out and around in Derby Bay. If conditions allow, it will extend it into Canada. The hope is that a skating trail on this side of the border can be maintained in addition to the oval. The goal is to offer the longest skating trail in the US.

Memphremagog Pond Hockey Tournament on February 7 and 8, 2015. 

Last year this one-day tournament had six teams participate. This year organizers are ready to expand it to two days and hope to double or triple the number of teams participating, and would like to hold the tournament at Prouty Beach as they did last year.

US Winter Swimming Championships on February 21, 22, 2015. 

Organizers have partnered with the fledgling US Winter Swimming Association to bring a very popular winter sport to North America. This event involves cutting two 25 meter swimming lanes in the ice and offering 25, 50, and 100 meter swims. Events in northern Europe typically draw 200 or more participants. Some draw 500. The world championships last year drew over 1,300.

These winter initiatives have the potential to draw significant national and international attention to the area and bring recreational athletic tourism to Newport.

Fiddler Richard Wood to light up the stage at the Haskell Opera House on Sunday

in Arts and Entertainment/Derby Line/News

concert_1DERBY LINE — Richard Wood and Gordon Belsher have lit up a lot of stages, from Carnegie Hall with the Chieftains, to David Letterman with Shania Twain, and on Sunday, they will be performing at the Haskell Opera House.

Wood, a fiery Prince Edward Island fiddler will be taking the stage on Sunday, October 19, at 7:30 p.m.

Over the years, Richard has graced the stage for Royalty – the Queen of England, the Emperor of Japan, and Canada’s Governors General. Most recently, he performed for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge during their Canadian visit to his home Province. He has entertained Canadian troops in Bosnia and Afghanistan, and MacLean’s Magazine named him one of the Top 100 Canadians to watch in the 21′st century.

Gordon Belsher brings a glowing warmth to the stage with a gentle charm that has become his trademark. His latest solo CD won “Roots Traditional Recording of the Year” at the 2013 MUSIC PEI Awards.

As accompanist and featured vocalist with Richard Wood, Gordon has toured extensively across Canada, the U.S., the U.K., Europe, Australia, and performed as part of the cultural delegation for Team Canada in Tokyo, Japan in 1999.

Over the last few years, Richard and Gordon have been performing and touring as a duo.

Enthusiastic audiences have been taken on a roller coaster ride of exhilarating – even exhausting – jigs and reels, strathspeys and hornpipes, and beautiful airs, many composed by Richard himself. This is complimented by Gordon’s engaging songs, some humorous and some poignant, warming things up for the next fiddle blaze.

Tickets for the show are $20.00, available by calling the Catamount Arts Box Office at 888-757-5559, or by visiting catamountarts.org.

To Reserve, call the Haskell Opera House Box Office: U.S. 802-873-3022; Canada 819-876-2471 (ext 205) and leave a message.

For a video of what you can expect from this amazing musician, watch the video below:

Victoria Young and Mary Hoadley keep the audience on the edge of their seats during Sunday's show.

The wait is over: Wait Until Dark opens at the Haskell

in Arts and Entertainment/Derby Line/Island Pond/Newport/Stanstead

Victoria Young and Mary Hoadley keep the audience on the edge of their seats during Sunday's show.
Victoria Young and Mary Hoadley keep the audience on the edge of their seats during Sunday’s show. All photos by Tanya Mueller.

DERBY LINE — Wait Until Dark, the suspenseful thriller that ends QNEK’s 21st Mainstage season at the Haskell Opera House in Derby Line, finished up its first run of shows over the weekend.

The story centers around Susy Hendrix (Mary Hoadley, Newport), a blind housewife who is first manipulated, and then terrorized inside her apartment by three con men looking for a doll that is loaded with heroin, that fell into her possession. The con men consist of the psychotic Roat (Ross Murray, Stanstead), Carlino (Brian McCrea, Newport) and Mike Talman (Mike Desjardins, Newport).

The vulnerable Susy must outmaneuver her tormentors, and turn her disability into her advantage, if she is to survive the ordeal.

10723483_10202562787103342_1019728484_n

Other characters in the show are Gloria (Victoria Young, Newport), who plays a young neighbor in the apartment building, and Susy’s photographer husband Sam (Nathan Sargent, Newport). Rounding off the cast are James Cross of Island Pond and Eric Alexandre of Magog, who both play policemen.

The show is full of suspense. Hoadley pulled off a wonderful performance on Sunday. The actress skillfully manages to keep the audience on the edge of their seats, as more than once she is surrounded by the con men inside the apartment, with her disability keeping her from verifying her suspicion that they are there.

Victoria Young, despite being very young, was incredible on Sunday, as she taunts and often terrorizes Susy herself, but in the end becomes the only one she can trust.

Ross Murray gives a brilliant performance as the sinister Roat, who has all the makings of the creepy bad guy. He shows little emotion, seeming to enjoy terrorizing not only Susy, but the two con men he lures into his scheme.

10704143_10202562793143493_7606269730583502954_n

Both McCrea and Desjardins work well together as actors, with the audience getting the sense that their characters are only pawns in the sick game that Roat is playing. Mike, played by Desjardins, even develops a little bit of a relationship with Susy.

Wait Until Dark, directed and designed by Susan-Lynn Johns, with a set built under the guidance of Tom Rooney by the North Country Union High School Building Trades class, will be running two more shows this Friday and Saturday. It’s a must see.

10723262_10202562787223345_2008633894_n

10721283_10202562787063341_739907502_n

Local on-farm community meals planned

in Albany/Arts and Entertainment/Island Pond/Newport

farmNEWPORT — Free to the public and kids are welcome, so what better way to share in the Fall harvest then at one of several on-farm community meals.

This fall, the Lunchbox, as part of Green Mountain Farm to School, is partnering with farms in the Northeast Kingdom to bring everyone a delicious free meal, a place to gather with the community, and hopefully enough sunshine to keep everyone warm.

Donations are encouraged to help fund their work. Check the schedule below to find out where to go. The events range from harvest festivals to on-farm workshops. Contact khansis@gmfts.org for specific information or directions.

Saturday, October 18th
12-5 p.m.
New Peasant Farm
190 Lane Road, Newport
Potluck style meal with dishes prepared by the Lunchbox featuring chicken from Apple Ledge and produce from New Peasant Farm and Kingdom Brewery. Kid friendly activities too!

Saturday, October 25th
12-5 p.m.
Flourish Day Farm & Nursery
422 Mcrae Road, Island Pond
Casual meal provided by the Lunchbox featuring produce from local farms. Kid friendly activities too! Event is $3 for families – includes free meal.

Saturday, November 1st
11 a.m.
Peace of Earth Farm
43 West Griggs Rd, Albany
Mulching demo plus chicken and vegetable soup prepared by the Lunchbox featuring Peace of Earth Farm ingredients.

Photo by Jeff Farbaniec, who runs the Saratoga Skier and Hiker website. To visit the site click on the photo.

Free season passes at Jay Peak for active-duty military and their families

in Arts and Entertainment/Jay/News
Photo by Jeff Farbaniec, who runs the Saratoga Skier and Hiker website. To visit the site click on the photo.
Photo by Jeff Farbaniec, who runs the Saratoga Skier and Hiker website. To visit the site click on the photo.

JAY — Jay Peak is expanding its military free skiing offerings. This winter any Vermont resident with a current and valid military ID, along with their immediate family members, will be eligible to receive a free season pass.

The offer extends across all service branches: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, and the National Guard. In addition to the free season pass, active Vermont military members and their family members will also receive a 50 percent discount on equipment rentals, and free skiing or riding lessons in the afternoons, space permitting.

“Vermonters have a long tradition of serving in the military and over the past thirteen years many of them have been in a war zone,” said Jay Peak president Bill Stenger. “Extending these types of offers that provide the chance to get outside and have some fun with family is the least we can do.”

To receive the free skiing and riding benefit, current members of the military and their families should visit the resort’s customer service center at Tramside together.

Customer Service is located just beneath the tram station. Passes will be issued after presenting military IDs that are issued to active-duty personnel and their family members.

US Winter Swimming Championships to debut on Lake Memphremagog in Newport

in Arts and Entertainment/Newport/News

wnter swimming championships Newport Vermont

NEWPORT — Kingdom Games and the US Winter Swimming Association (USWSA) are partnering to host the first ever US Winter Swimming Championships in North America. The championships will be held during the weekend of February 21, 2015, on Lake Memphremagog, in two 25-meter swimming lanes cut out of the frozen lake.

The water temperature of Lake Memphremagog is expected to be around 32 degrees Fahrenheit, and the likely air temperature will range from 0 to 25 degrees. The organizers plan to offer championship races over the following distances: 25, 50 and 100 meters.

A 250 meter event will be included if there are sufficient resources to build proper warming facilities for swimmers who will need to recover following a swim of this distance in such cold water.

The swimming lanes will be cut out of the “infield” of a 700 meter speed skating oval which will also host the North American Speedskating Championships two weeks prior to the swimming championships. The oval was made last year adjacent to the The EastSide Restaurant in Newport.

The US Winter Swimming Association is a recently formed non-profit organization with the mission to promote winter swimming in the United States. Winter swimming is extremely popular in countries with colder climates. Competitions in Russia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Sweden, Finland, Latvia, Estonia, China, and even Great Britain and South Africa typically draw hundreds of swimmers. Over 1,300 swimmers competed in the 2014 Winter Swimming World Championships which were held in Lapland, Finland this past February.

get-attachment (1)In the US, interest in winter swimming has been growing over the past five years. The USWSA was formed to make these competitions available in the United States.

When Kingdom Games expressed an interest in conducting a winter swimming event on Lake Memphremagog, the founders of USWSA were quick to respond and a partnership was formed.

Kingdom Games and the USWSA are also in discussions with South Africa’s Ram Barkai, the founder of the International Ice Swimming Association, to explore the feasibility of conducting future “ice swims” which are 1 km or longer. However, the infrastructure and local experience required to safely support swimmers during and after these longer distances needs to be in place before these longer swims can be added to the calendar.

The organizers are looking for local and national support for this first championship venture and they will be opening an online registration on November 1, 2014 via http://kingdomgames.co and www.uswsa.org.

There is much work to be done to make this winter swimming championships happen. Community support in the Newport area will be critical in addition to the support of the winter swimming community in the USA and abroad. Sponsorship of the event both locally and nationally will also be important to help cover the costs of creating the venue and providing proper recovery facilities when the swimmers exit the water.

Kingdom Games and the USWSA have already formed a strong partnership and each of the principal organizers has experience in undertaking large athletic challenges. They are confident that, with local and national support and the support of swimmers themselves, this winter swimming championships can be organized within the next four months.

For more information please contact: Phil White, Director, Kingdom Games at phw1948@gmail.com (802-249-9100)

R Cristian Vergara, US Winter Swimming Association, info@uswsa.org

QNEK’s “Wait Until Dark” begins Friday

WUD_Press_Photo

DERBY LINE — QNEK Productions, the Award-Winning International Theatre Company in Residence at the Haskell Opera House, finishes its 21st Mainstage Season with the highly entertaining and suspenseful thriller, Wait Until Dark, directed and designed by Susan-Lynn Johns with a set built under the guidance of Tom Rooney by the North Country Union High School Building Trades class.

Written by Frederick Knott, author of the classic mystery, Dial M for Murder, Wait Until Dark captures the audience with its complex story and noir undertones. In a time when gore and extreme violence run rampant in film and television, audiences will find it refreshing to find horror in the chase, more so than in a pool of blood.

The heroine of the story, set in the 1960s, is blind housewife, Susy Hendrix (Mary Hoadley, Newport). Independent and resourceful, Susy is learning to cope with her blindness, which resulted from a recent accident. She is aided by her difficult, slightly unreliable young neighbor, Gloria (Victoria Young, Newport), with whom she has an exasperated but lovingly maternal relationship.

Susy’s life is changed as she is terrorized by a group of criminals who believe she has hidden a baby doll used by them to smuggle heroin into the country. Unknown to Susy, her photographer husband Sam (Nathan Sargent, Newport) took the doll as a favor for a woman he met on an international plane flight and unwittingly brought the doll to the couple’s New York apartment when the woman became afraid of the customs officials.

Alone in her apartment and cut-off from the outside world, Susy must fight for her life against a gang of ruthless criminals, led by the violent, psychotic Roat (Ross Murray, Stanstead). The tension builds as Roat and his accomplices Carlino (Brian McCrea, Newport) and Mike Talman (Mike Desjardins, Newport), impersonate police detectives and friends of her husband in order to win Susy’s confidence, gaining access to her apartment to look for the doll.

The climax of the play, a vicious physical confrontation between Susy and Roat in her dark kitchen, is one of the most memorable and frightening scenes in theatre history. Rounding off the cast as policemen are James Cross of Island Pond and Eric Alexandre of Magog.

Performance dates are October 10, 11, 17, and 18 at 7:30 p.m and October 12 at 2:00 p.m. at the Haskell Opera House, Derby Line, VT/Stanstead, QC.

Reserve tickets by calling the QNEK Box Office at 802-624-1490, charge tickets via phone or online through Catamount Arts, 888-757-5559, www.catamountarts.org, or purchase at The MAC Center for the Arts, Main Street, Newport.

For information and group rate quotes contact the QNEK Business Office at 803-334-2216.

First Friday Movie Night in Derby Line

in Arts and Entertainment/Derby Line

Picture 14

DERBY LINE — The Derby Line Events committee hosts a First Friday Free Family Movie Night at the Derby Line Village Hall, located at 104 Main Street in Derby Line (beside US route 5 customs). Every first Friday beginning at 7 p.m., bring your family to watch a family friendly movie. Admission to the movie is FREE!

On October 3rd, they will celebrate Halloween early. They will show a classic ghost movie where four guys don their proton packs to save New York City from an invasion of ghosts. The movie is rated PG.

Because of licensing restrictions, they are not allowed to publically advertise the name of the movie that they plan to show each month, but can send out a monthly email to announce the movie title. If you’d like to be included on this email list, please email myersbethany@hotmail.com and ask to be included on the Family Movie Night email list.

You can also call the village office at 802-873-3420 and ask what the next movie will be. They are also open to suggestions for movies you would like to see. There is even a website where you can go to see when the next movie will be: http://myersbethany.wix.com/derbylineday#!movienight/c78l

Feel free to have your kids brings blankets, sleeping bags, or pillows to lay on the floor of the hall to watch the movie. The goal is to provide a fun, comfortable, family night out.

Concessions will be available for sale and all money raised from the sale of concessions will benefit the Derby Line Events & Beautification Committee. The events committee is responsible for organizing the annual Derby Line Community Day.

Children 10 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Please, no outside food or drink. For questions or if you’d like to volunteer at the movie night, please contact Bethany at 873-3028 or myersbethany@hotmail.com.

Rusty DeWees and Cindy Pierce visiting local schools Thursday and Friday

in Arts and Entertainment/Brownington/Charleston/coventry/News

Picture 11COVENTRY — Rusty DeWees, aka The Logger, and Cindy Pierce, well-known comic storyteller, will bring their humor and wisdom to local schools over the next few days.

DeWees is a household name to Vermonters, celebrating all that makes rural Vermont and its people so cherished. The Stowe High School graduate earned a degree from Champlain College before heading off to a career of acting, writing, music and comedy. But Rusty says his time working with Vermont youth to promote positive and heartfelt choices is particularly gratifying.

“Young Vermont students are an alert, focused and engaging lot,” said DeWees. “That’s what I’ve found when presenting to them … always. My presentation is not only for students, parents will be invited to share the evening presentations with their kids. Working with GEAR UP to gear up young Vermonters and their parents for education beyond high school is a worthy effort. We’ll all learn and have fun. No joke.”

Cindy Pierce, who is an innkeeper in Etna, N.H. and mother of three teenagers, keeps her skills sharp – and hilarious – with stories about finding the way through everyday life. She is particularly inspiring in helping kids connect with their “healthy crew” and tap into their inner compass. Pierce holds a master’s degree in education from Antioch New England.

“These days, young people are exposed to information and issues earlier than most adults would consider addressing those issues,” Pierce said. “I believe that information is power. With humor and honesty, I hope to give kids some tools and information to help them find focus and withstand inevitable speed bumps while navigating life.”

The schedule over the next few days is as follows:

Thursday, October 2

Brownington Central School
8 a.m. Arrive at school and meet with Elaine and staff as available
8:45 Presentation to middle school
10/10:15 Schedule open to visit classrooms as invited
11 a.m.– depart for Coventry

Coventry Village School
12 noon Arrive at school and meet Matthew and staff as available
12:45 Presentation to middle school
2/2:15 Schedule open to visit classrooms as invited
3 p.m. Break (unless Rusty checks out afterschool programs/sports)

Coventry Village School
6-6:45 p.m. Dinner hosted by Brownington and Coventry
6:45-8 Rusty presentation to parents and families

Friday, October 3

Brighton Elementary School
8 a.m. Arrive at school and meet with Denise/Judy and staff as available
8:45 Presentation to middle school
10/10:15 Schedule open to visit classrooms as invited
11 a.m. – depart for Charleston

Charleston Elementary School
12 noon Arrive at school and meet Jessica/Sharon and staff as available
12:45 Presentation to middle school
2/2:15 Schedule open to visit classrooms as invited
Break (unless Rusty checks out afterschool programs/sports)

Charleston Elementary School
6-6:45 p.m. Dinner hosted by Brighton and Charleston
6:45-8 Rusty presentation to parents and families

Antiques and classics come out for the Newport Fall Foliage Festival

in Arts and Entertainment/Newport
Award winners from the Newport Fall Foliage Festival Antique Car Show. From left to right:  Chick Gagnon, Kenneth Farino and Larry Gaboriault. All photos courtesy of Newport Live.
Award winners from the Newport Fall Foliage Festival Antique Car Show. From left to right: Chick Gagnon, Kenneth Farino and Larry Gaboriault. All photos courtesy of Newport Live.

NEWPORT — The Newport Fall Foliage Festival attracted nearly 30 vehicles for its Antique and Classic Car Parade during Saturday’s festival. Awards were handed out in the three categories of:

Most Interesting
Best Restoration
Judges Award

Roger Grenier, of Derby Line, drove his special edition Ford Mustang, celebrating the car’s 40th anniversary. There were muscle cars from the 60’s and 70’s with motors ranging up to Hugh McNeal’s 425 cubic inch 370 horsepower Oldsmobile Starfire convertible. There were classic Pontiacs, Chryslers, Plymouths, Chevys and Dodges, in addition to suped up pickups and an antique Willys Jeep.

IMG_1358

The parade also featured the next generation of car collectors, with Katherine Slicer’s John Deere 110 and Kate Cornelius’ customized purple leaf GoKart. While most vehicles in the parade were motor driven, Ben Luna rode in a 1907 green horse drawn Wagonette carriage owned and driven by Steve Allen.

At the car show in the parking lot of the Gateway Center, judges awarded Chick Gagnon the Most Interesting Award for his 1936 Ford Tudor.

The Best Restoration Award went to Kenneth Fearino for his 1977 Chevrolet Nova Concourse.

The Judges Award was presented to Larry Gaboriault and his Maroon 1976 Pontiac Catalina.

IMG_1357

Photo by Tanya Mueller.

Fat Bike Demo Day coming to Derby

in Arts and Entertainment/Derby/Newport
Photo by Tanya Mueller.
Photo by Tanya Mueller.

DERBY — Think that cold weather is the end of bike riding season? Think again.The Village Bike Shop will be hosting a Demo Day on Sunday September 28, for all those riders who’d like to try a fat bike, mountain bike or even a cyclocross bike.

It’s the perfect opportunity to try a new ride and maybe try some of the awesome single and double-track trails in Primeau Woods. Primeau Woods is a local network of off road trails that can be accessed either from the dedicated parking off the North Derby Road, or direct access off the Beebe Spur bike path.

This track is a hidden gem, and if you have not had the opportunity to explore the Memphremagog Ski Touring Foundation (MSTF) trails, then mark your calendars for September 28, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

These trails were created for cross country skiing but are open to bikes during the spring, summer and autumn. This network of trails is inviting to the novice rider but can also be challenging to the more advanced riders. It will also be a perfect place to demo a new bike.

Jeff Manning, owner of The Village Bike Shop, will have a selection of bikes and easy parking is available off the North Derby Road, just look for the colorful balloons and the MSTF Parking sign right next to the green barn.

Riders are also invited to support this local gem by joining MSTF so we can ensure a bright future for all-season sports. The trails are maintained by tireless volunteers who get up to groom the trails while most of us are still sleeping, but during the non snow seasons they open the trails to bikers free-of-charge.

1 8 9 10 11 12 14
Go to Top