New border markers in Derby Line have residents upset

in Derby Line/News
Photo shows the exit from the Post Office in Derby Line, where motorists have said that their view to turn onto Main Street has been hindered by the CBP vehicle set up to alert travelers to stop at the Port of Entry.
Photo shows the exit from the Post Office in Derby Line, where motorists have said that their view to turn onto Main Street has been hindered by the CBP vehicle set up to alert travelers to stop at the Port of Entry.

DERBY LINE — In an attempt to alert motorists entering the U.S. at the Route 5 Port of Entry at Derby Line, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) recently added two new markers that have upset village residents. The recent complaints have sparked an emergency meeting to be called by village trustees, who are concerned by the new markers, as well as the lack of communication that the CPB has had with the village.

The two markers consist of an orange barrier placed between the north and southbound lanes on Route 5 that sits at the top of the hill where motorists enter the U.S.

The second marker is a CBP vehicle that sits parked outside the customs station, extending out toward Route 5, causing a visibility issue for people exiting the Derby Line Post Office. The vehicle is often seen with lights flashing, and engine running.

derby lne vermont controversy port of entry

“Not only are these markers an eyesore, I’d like to know why we have to have that vehicle running the whole day?” a resident who chose to remain anonymous asked. “With a new anti-idling law issued in Vermont, what gives them the right to keep idling the vehicle and polluting our air, while we could essentially be ticketed if we leave our vehicle running while going inside the gas station to buy milk.”

Others who were interviewed voiced similar concerns with the flashing lights, and idling vehicle. The orange barrier is also directly blocking a parking space outside Brown’s Drug Store.

The emergency meeting to address the issue will be held on September 17, between village trustees and the CBP, but it will not be open to the public.

The lack of communication between village trustees and the CBP that trustees are concerned about stems from the fact that they were never made aware that the new markers would be installed. At a meeting the trustees had with the CBP on July 17, the new markers were never brought up.

Village Trustee Keith Beadle has stated that the flashing stoplights and road sign that were used in the past should be enough to alert incoming motorists that there is a port of entry ahead. He has also stated that these new measures also hinder businesses from coming to the area.

“These markers are tacky, obnoxious, and a total disregard to the people who live here,” the woman who wished to remain anonymous concluded.

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